Emily Dickinson and Her Culture
Read Online
Share

Emily Dickinson and Her Culture The Soul"s Society (Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture) by Barton Levi St Armand

  • 883 Want to read
  • ·
  • 66 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Poetry & poets: 19th century,
  • Literature and society,
  • 19th Century American Poetry,
  • Poetry,
  • English,
  • History,
  • USA,
  • Massachusetts,
  • Dickinson, Emily,
  • Literary Criticism & Collections / American,
  • 19th century,
  • 1830-1886,
  • Criticism and interpretation,
  • Dickinson, Emily,,
  • United States,
  • Women and literature

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages320
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7734682M
ISBN 100521262674
ISBN 109780521262675

Download Emily Dickinson and Her Culture

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

  The great American poet Emily Dickinson has long been seen as a figure isolated from her contemporaries and insulated from her surrounding culture. This book attempts to place her texts in their cultural contexts by exploring her attitude towards death, romance, the afterlife, God, nature and : Cambridge University Press. The great American poet Emily Dickinson has long been seen as a figure isolated from her contemporaries and insulated from her surrounding culture. This book attempts to place her texts in their cultural contexts by exploring her attitude towards death, romance, the afterlife, God, nature and art. The great American poet Emily Dickinson has long been seen as a figure isolated from her contemporaries and insulated from her surrounding culture. This book attempts to place her texts in their cultural contexts by exploring her attitude towards death, romance, the afterlife, God, nature and art/5(5). Emily Dickinson has long been seen as a figure isolated from her contemporaries and insulated from her surrounding culture. This book attempts to place her texts in their cultural contexts. Read more.

Emily Dickinson has long been seen as a figure isolated from her contemporaries and insulated from her surrounding culture. This book attempts to place her texts in their cultural contexts. Only 10 of Emily Dickinson’s nearly 1, poems are known to have been published in her lifetime. Devoted to private pursuits, she sent hundreds of poems to friends and correspondents while apparently keeping the greater number to herself. She habitually worked . Emily Dickinson's stature as a writer soared from the first publication of her poems in their intended form. She is known for her poignant and compressed verse, which profoundly influenced the direction of 20th-century poetry. The strength of her literary voice, as well as her reclusive and eccentric life, Born: Barton Levi St. Armand, Emily Dickinson and Her Culture: The Soul's Society, pp. there is little doubt that Higginson himself was the most enduring of Dickinson's literary loyalties.

  Modern depictions of Emily Dickinson often try to liberate her from the stuffy hang-ups of a bygone era. Take, for example, “Dickinson,” writer-producer Alena Smith’s Apple TV+ series.   Emily Dickinson and her culture: the soul's society by St. Armand, Barton Levi. Publication date Topics Dickinson, Emily, , Literature and society, Women and literature Publisher Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York: Cambridge University Press Internet Archive Books. Scanned in : Garnering awards from Choice, Christianity Today, Books & Culture, and the Conference on Christianity and Literature when first published in , Roger Lundin's Emily Dickinson and the Art of Belief has been widely recognized as one of the finest biographies of the great American poet Emily Dickinson. Paying special attention to her experience of faith, Lundin skillfully relates Dickinson's life -- as it can Cited by:   “Emily Dickinson has been called everything from `the outlaw of Amherst,' `the best friend of reclusive English majors,’ and `an intellectual terrorist,’ ” she writes in the introduction. “There is no doubt she is a towering poetic voice. But there’s something else about her too. Emily Dickinson reminds us what it’s like to be alive.