Analysis of the intergeneric relationships of the Australian frog family Myobatrachidae
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Analysis of the intergeneric relationships of the Australian frog family Myobatrachidae by W. Ronald Heyer

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Published by Smithsonian Institution Press in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Australia.

Subjects:

  • Myobatrachidae.,
  • Amphibians -- Evolution.,
  • Amphibians -- Classification.,
  • Amphibians -- Australia.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 28-29.

StatementW. Ronald Heyer and David S. Liem.
SeriesSmithsonian contributions to zoology ; 233, Smithsonian contributions to zoology ;, no. 233.
ContributionsLiem, David S., joint author.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL1 .S54 no. 233, QL668.E2615 .S54 no. 233
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 29 p. :
Number of Pages29
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5016369M
LC Control Number76608054

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Analysis of the intergeneric relationships of the Australian frog family Myobatrachidae (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: W Ronald Heyer; David S Liem; Smithsonian Institution. An Electrophoretic Investigation of Relationships of Diploid and Tetraploid Species of Australian Desert Frogs Neobatrachus (Anura: Myobatrachidae) January Australian Journal of Zoology 44(6).   Molecular Phylogeny of the Australian Frog Genera Crinia, Geocrinia, and Allied Taxa (Anura: Myobatrachidae) Author links open overlay panel Kathryn Read a Keogh a 1 Ian A.W. Scott a Roberts b Paul Doughty aCited by: Family Myobatrachidae. DOWN TO KEY; These frogs are known as the Southern Frogs and are sometimes placed in the Leptodactylidae family, a family of frogs found in both South and Central America. (This is a matter of some controversy among herpetologists). In Australia, they are represented by over species in 21 genera.

  Mahony MJ, Robinson ES () Nucleolar organiser region (NOR) location in karyotypes of Australian ground frogs (Family Myobatrachidae). Genetica – CrossRef Google Scholar Mahony MJ, Donnellan SC, Roberts JD () An electrophoretic investigation of relationships of diploid and tetraploid species of Australian desert frogs. 91% of Australian species belong to the families Hylidae and Myobatrachidae. These families are now thought to be endemic to Australia and New Guinea, but related to South American families via a common Gondwanan ancestry. Species belonging to the Myobatrachidae family of frogs are terrestrial or aquatic, with no arboreal species. Analysis of intergeneric relationships of the Australian frog family Myobatrachidae. Smithsonian Contributions to Zool 1– Burrowing behaviour and assocoiated hindlimb morphology of. Heyer WR, Liem DS () Analysis of the intergeneric relationships of the Australian frog family Myobatrachidae. Smiths Contrib Zool – Google Scholar.

  M.J. Mahony, E.S. RobinsonNucleolar organizer region location in karyotypes of Australian ground frogs (family Myobatrachidae) Genetica, 68 (), pp. View Record in Scopus Google Scholar. Frogs sightings in South Australia are organised into "Bio Regions". Spotted Marsh Frog, Spotted Grass Frog. Family: MYOBATRACHIDAE. Regions: Central Districts, Mt Lofty Ranges & Adelaide Plains, Murray Valley, North East, South East. More info. Listen. Listen.   Analysis of prey items in alimentary tracts revealed significant sex differences in prey types. For example, females ate proportionally more arthropods and fewer molluscs than did males. Analysis of intergeneric relationships of the Australian frog family Myobatrachidae. Smithsonian Contributions in Apology. Myobatrachidae - the 'southern frogs' There are many species in this family throughout Australia Pictured to the left is the great barred frog, which gives a deep "Walk, walk-walk" call, mostly at night but sometimes in daylight hours.